Aloxe-Corton

Aloxe-Corton links the Côte De Nuits with the Côte De Beaune, it is the hill of Corton that signals a change in the landscape. Towards Beaune the land becomes more rounded, its sharp contours yielding to gentle valleys. Like its neighbours Ladoix-Serrigny and Pernand-Vergelesses, Aloxe-Corton (pronounced “Alosse”) enjoys a perfect wine-growing location and forms a guard of honour, as it were, on the approach to the prestigious Grands Crus of Corton and Corton-Charlemagne. The Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée dates back to 1938.

A cross section of the Corton hill reveals a classic geological picture. At altitudes of between 200 and 300 metres, the soil is reddish brown with flint and limestone debris (known as “chaillots”) mixed in, and it is rich in potassium and phosphoric acid. The vines face due east. Wines from the northern end of the Aloxe-Corton appellation are more tender and fruity, while those from the southern end are firmer and more complex. Pebbly soil favours supple, highly-bred wines, while clay and marl breeds firmness and complexity.

The impressive power and generous, opulent personality of the Aloxe-Corton reds demand gutsy, well-flavoured dishes.
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