Champagne Boizel

The story of Champagne Boizel is the story of five generations of the Boizel family and their inextricable link to their vineyards. In 1831, Auguste Boizel married Julie Martin, a descendant of a long line of winegrowers who had been established in Aÿ since the 16th century. Although they were both very young, three years later, in 1834, Auguste and Julie founded their eponymous Champagne house, christening it with the names of both of their families which was most unusual for the time. They were also among the first in Champagne to affix a label to their bottles.

It was only through enthusiasm, perseverance, and force of will that Boizel-Martin managed to succeed as the production of Champagne still held many secrets. 
Production was unreliable as harvests were often very poor in both quantity and quality; secondary fermentation occurred irregularly because the role of sugar and yeasts had not yet been recognised or understood; and, even if everything went smoothly during the winemaking process, sometimes over half of the bottles would break in the cellars during second fermentation due to the fragility of the glass used. They also had to create a market for their wines, both at home and abroad.

Edouard Boizel, son of Auguste and Julie, married Adèle Camuset, a descendant of another illustrious Champagne house, in 1868 and together they developed Boizel's first brut Champagnes as a contrast to the fashion for sweeter wines at that time. A part of their drive to increase quality ever further they also created Boizel's first vintage Champagne, a few bottle of which still remain in the family's deepest cellars.

After the ravages of the First World War, Jules Boizel succeeded his father in 1918 and he set about further refining the delicacy of his brut Champagnes. His legacy to Boizel was the Blanc De Blanc cuvée that he first produced in 1929. War had once again taken its heavy toll upon France when Jules' son René took over in 1945. His primary aim was to replenish stocks and he swiftly recovered the lustre and eminence of the Boizel house. Inspired by the legendary vintage of 1961, Jules developed Boizel's first prestige cuvée, Joyau De France.

Following the heartbreaking passing of her husband René and the serious illness of her son Eric in 1972, Erica Boizel bravely took the reins, aided by her daughter and son-in-law Evelyne and Christophe. To celebrate the marque's 150th anniversary in 1984, Evelyne summed up the spirit of the Boizel family in a new company motto: "One family, one house, one tradition" and set up a new headquarters on the Avenue de Champagne in Epernay. She also modernised and re-equipped the winery and barrel cellar to help secure the quality of future vintages. As of 2011, Evelyne and Christophe's children, Florent and Lionel, have joined their parents bringing with them their experience of winemaking both in France and abroad to contribute to the ongoing development of Boizel.

Boizel owns 7 hectares of vineyards in Champagne and has close relationships and long standing contracts with many other growers who supply top quality grapes to satisfy its requirements. These are crushed and fermented in the ultramodern, temperature controlled winery to preserve the clarity and aromas of the fruit in the vins clairs - the still wines that form the base of Boizel Champagne. The still wines are tasted every two weeks between the end of November and February to understand their individual characteristics before the selection process for blending takes place in March or April. A proportion of one and two year old reserve wines are also added to the Boizel NV, bringing body and consistency to the blend. Some of the wines from grand cru vineyards are aged in oak to add further complexity to the blender's palette. Once blending is compete, it is time alone that allows the development of complexity, body and harmony, everything that Champagne lovers expect from Boizel Champagnes.
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