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Vigneti Le Monde

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Le Monde is an area located between the banks of the Livenza and Meduna rivers, close to the border between the provinces of Treviso and Pordenone in northeastern Italy. The territory, formerly belonging to the Austrian-Hungarian Empire, takes its name from the German word "Mundio" that referred to the protection granted by the Emperor over some of his lands.

The area began to gain significance around the year 1000, under the dominion of the Republic of Venice. La Serenissima (the Venetian Republic) constructed numerous villas in this region and developed its agricultural resources by connecting nearby farms located along watercourses to the Venetian Lagoon. The winery of Le Monde was the wine-growing business of Villa Giustinian in Portobuffolè, an ancient village that was already documented in 997 as a castle and river harbour of the Venetian Republic. Today, it is the only rural house still operating on the lands that once belonged to the Villa. The winery headquarters are housed in eighteenth century buildings that echo the architectural characteristics of that time.

Although falling under the Friuli Grave registered designation of origin, Le Monde is characterised by a calcareous clayey soil that differs from the soils found in the usually gravelly areas known as Grave. For this reason it is considered to be a distinct cru. Today, the Le Monde vineyards cover some 40 hectares and they are all over 30 years of age, giving excellent quality fruit. The soil, exposure and micro-climate all add to the impressive nature of their wines and their adoption of reasoned agriculture techniques means that chemical pesticides are kept to a minimum.

Originally the property of the Pistoni family, the Le Monde winery and vineyards were bought by Alex Maccan in 2008.
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