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Château Léoville Las Cases

One of the oldest Médoc estates, Domaine De Léoville belonged to some of the wealthiest and most influential noble French families before it was acquired by the Las Cases family. During the French Revolution, the estate was split up between 1826 and 1840 as a result of the policy of expropriation of emigrants’ property and the constitution of egalitarian redistribution. Château Léoville Las Cases was subsequently created from 3/5 of the original estate in the heart of the domain.

The Grand Vin’s current terroir has therefore been at the historic heart of the original estate since the 17th century. Pierre Jean, Adolphe and Gabriel De Las Cases were successive heirs to the property until 1900, when Théophile Skawinski purchased a share in the estate and became its manager. Léoville Las Cases has now been managed by the same family since the late 19th century and is today represented by Jean-Hubert Delon, sole owner of the Château and proprietor of Château Potensac in the Médoc and Château Nénin in Pomerol.

The Grand Vin is the product of exceptional terroirs from the former Léoville estate. These terroirs are located mainly in the Clos Léoville Las Cases, which you pass as you leave the village of Saint-Julien heading for Pauillac. They extend over nearly 60ha, producing complex, polished Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc with characteristics which are totally unique to the Grand Vin of Léoville du Marquis de Las Cases and which have been widely recognised for many years.

The Clos encases a terroir of great complexity. It is mainly composed of Quaternary gravel ("graves" in French) over gravelly sand and gravelly clay subsoils. We also find clays which are variably deep and compact, but which sometimes break through to the surface. The proximity of the Gironde River has created the wide diversity of soils, formed over various geological periods. The river also creates a special microclimate that enables very early ripening of the grapes and protects the vineyards from frost. This combination of geological and geographical influences affect the growth of the vines and the quality of the grapes: regular but restricted water supply and a very low intake of nutrients bring out the best in the great Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc which usually achieve their full potential whatever the vintage. The incomparable terroir gives this great wine its unique personality.
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